Flipside

A collection dedicated to the rediscovery and reappraisal of cult British films that might otherwise be forgotten; with every title a fuller understanding of British cinema emerges. Out from the shadows of history, these films offer an exciting exploration into an alternative British cinema.

  • Requiem for a Village

    The idyllic, rural past of a Suffolk village comes to life through the memories of an old man who tends a country graveyard, in this extraordinary film directed by David Gladwell. Although best known for his celebrated work as editor on Lindsay Anderson’s If…. and O Lucky Man!, Gladwell has, unti...

  • Skinflicker

    Presented as found footage à la The Blair Witch Project, this chilling and provocative fake home movie presents the story of three dissidents and their plan to commit a revolutionary act on film. Will Knightley (father of Keira) plays one of the guerrillas who kidnap and torture a cabinet minister.

  • Repeater

    Comic thriller influenced by the French New Wave which, with its unorthodox narrative about a woman's confession of murder, deconstructs the conventions of the thriller genre. Directed by Christopher Monger (Voice Over), who would go on to have a successful Hollywood career, Repeater was produced...

  • Central Bazaar

    For this remarkable experimental film, the provocative avant-garde legend Stephen Dwoskin gathered together a group of strangers and filmed them as they explored their fantasies over a period of five days: a project that now sounds a little like TV's Big Brother. The ceremonial gowns and make-up ...

  • The Moon over the Alley

    The Moon Over the Alley reunited Duffer writer/directors Joseph Despins and William Dumaresq, with this strange London-set musical, again scored by Galt MacDermont (Hair). The film explores the problems facing the multicultural residents in a Notting Hill boarding house of the early 1970s, desti...

  • Recluse

    Harrowing drama based on the true story of a murder and suicide that took place on the Luxton family farm in Devon in the 1970s. Sensitively handled by director Bob Bentley and superbly edited by the acclaimed David Gladwell, Recluse stars Maurice Denham and boasts fine naturalistic perfomances f...

  • Herostratus

    When a young poet (Michael Gothard, the brilliant character actor who excelled in films such as The Devils and The Valley Obscured by Clouds) hires a marketing company to turn his suicide into a mass-media spectacle, he finds that his subversive intentions are quickly diluted into a reactionary g...

  • Justine

    The directorial debut of illustrator and producer Stewart Mackinnon, Justine is a near-lost example of British avant-garde cinema of the 1970s. Produced by the BFI Production Board in 1976, it has been out of circulation for the entire 40 years since.

  • The Man Who Haunted Himself

    Conservative executive Harold Pelham (a harrowing and atypical performance by Roger Moore) is involved in a car accident and declared momentarily dead. When he's eventually released from the hospital, Pelham discovers that an exact double of him has recently been seen in places that he's never be...

  • The Boy Who Turned Yellow

    The Boy Who Turned Yellow is the splendidly eccentric final collaboration from the eminent filmmaking duo Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. London schoolboy John Saunders turns a bright yellow after losing his pet mouse on a school trip. Is the mysterious colour change the result of an alien...

  • Dust

    While attempting a robbery, Edge (Adrian Lester), a burglar, is held at gunpoint by an elderly woman and forced to hear a story. The story involves two brothers at the turn of the 20th Century, as they feud over a young woman. Ingeniously switching between two entwining stories from the past and ...

  • The Final Programme

    This cult adaptation of Michael Moorcock's novel stars Jon Finch as hip, party-hungry adventurer Jerry Cornelius, troubled by the recent passing of his father but reluctantly on the hunt for the mysterious 'Final Programme': dad's design for the perfect self-replicating human. Terrific performan...

  • Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets

    It's 1949, and Sir Hugo Coal (Alan Bates) is too wrapped up in reconstructing the bones of a dinosaur to notice that his wife, Lady Harriet Coal (Theresa Russell), has taken a particular liking to their butler, Fledge (Sting). Yet, Sir Hugo does put his foot down when his daughter Cleo (Lena Head...

  • Incident at Loch Ness

    Legendary director Werner Herzog plays up to his intrepid documentarian persona, cultivated in films like Grizzly Man, in this hilarious mockumentary about a film crew travelling to Scotland to try and find the elusive Loch Ness Monster. Pitched somewhere between Waiting for Guffman and The Blair...

  • Paperhouse

    Bernard Rose’s cult adult fantasy draws us into the story of Anna Madden, a disillusioned young girl who immerses herself in a world of notebook illustrations. Each time she dreams, however, these drawings come to life – she has discovered another world to explore. After drawing a boy into her dr...

  • Anchoress

    Chris Newby’s poetic debut feature addresses the gulf between patriarchal power and female ritual and rebellion against the backdrop of a remote Medieval village.

  • Play Me Something

    Tilda Swinton stars in a playful and ingenious cine-essay from art critic John Berger (Ways of Seeing) and author/filmmaker Timothy Neat.

  • Traveller

    Musician Davy Spillane stars as a reluctantly-married young traveller in this Irish road movie written by Neil Jordan. Michael and his wife Angela are tasked with smuggling goods back over the border from Strabane, but their road trip seems doomed at every turn - weighed down by history and pover...